Articles Posted in Young Professionals

Gun Trusts: Background Check Loophole Eliminated

A gun trust is a legal device that makes it easier to handle firearms after the gun owner’s death. These trusts are used for guns that are regulated by federal laws: the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA) and a revision of the NFA, Title II of the Gun Control Act of 1968. Gun trusts must take into account both federal and state weapons laws. Some of the weapons regulated by the NFA include silencers, machine guns, grenades, short-barreled shotguns, and short-barreled rifles. These weapons already have some regulations in place, including requiring its serial number to be registered with the Federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF).

Although there are restrictions in place, the NFA allowed the making or transferring of a firearm without a background check through a gun trust. The Attorney General, on January 4, 2016, signed a regulatory rule to close up this dangerous loophole: Machineguns, Destructive Devices and Certain Other Firearms; Background Checks for Responsible Persons of a Trust or Legal Entity With Respect To Making or Transferring a Firearm. This rule, also known as ATF Final Rule 41F (the “Rule”), will have a huge impact on the use of trusts in the sharing and in the acquisition of weapons regulated by the NFA. It seeks to ensure that proper identification and background checks apply equally to legal entities, trusts, and individuals. The rule became effective on July 13, 2016, 180 days after its signing. However, the Rule is not retroactive, and as such, pending applications will not be affected.

Florida Appeals Court Comes Down Against Probate Creditor Claims From Child For Child Support Arrearages

On May 11, 2016, the Fourth District Court of Appeal issued its decision in Davis v. Hengen regarding creditor claims for child support arrearages against a decedent’s estate, when the decedent dies with unpaid child support obligations.

Upon the dissolution of their marriage, Clifford Davis and his then wife entered into a marital and property settlement agreement. According to the agreement, Clifford was obligated to pay monthly child support to his ex-wife to support their daughter, Deborah. When the father died, he died intestate. At the time of his death, the father had outstanding child support payments due. Deborah and Clifford’s current wife, Acaia, were appointed co-personal representatives of Clifford’s estate.

The Shifting Landscape of Guardianship Law: Three Consecutive Years of Changes

(Published in The Florida Bar Journal, September 2016) 

Members of The Florida Bar Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section’s (RPPTL) Guardianship, Power of Attorney and Advance Directives Committee are keenly aware that there have been major changes to Florida’s guardianship laws in the last several years. The political climate of the past few years has been decidedly against guardianships and, in particular, professional guardians, due to perceived abuses by them. The current political climate is due in part to hearings held before the Florida Legislature during the 2014 session in which organized members of the public testified about the horrors of guardianships. While some of the horror stories came from disgruntled family members unhappy with the results of their particular guardianship litigation, others made legitimate points regarding the need to improve the system.

Estate Planning for Young Professionals: Don’t Wait to Start Planning

Discussing one’s death can be an awkward and uncomfortable experience at any age. It is a topic that most individuals avoid at all costs, especially young adults, as if the mere discussion of one’s future demise will somehow bring it about. While it may not be pleasant dinner conversation, discussions of what will and should happen in the event of death should take place sooner rather than later.

Most young professionals do not feel a sense of urgency when it comes to estate planning, and believe that they have all of the time in the world.  Many young professionals also do not have much of an estate to speak of, maybe some bank accounts, some property if they are lucky, and likely a lot of student debt. Many individuals with few assets do not see the need for any type of estate plan. However, such an outlook is shortsighted and fails to take into account assets that will be acquired in the future. Early estate planning can protect the estate an individual does have, maximize the value and income of both their current and future assets, and also ensure seamless transfer of assets to loved ones in the event of death.

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